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Goal: 60,000 Progress: 47,957
Sponsored by: The Breast Cancer Site

A woman who has inherited a harmful mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 is about five times more likely to develop breast cancer than a woman who does not have such a mutation. A positive genetic mutation test result can bring relief from uncertainty and allow women to make informed decisions about their future, including taking steps to reduce their cancer risk.

Insurance companies should not have the right to decide who gets funded for testing. Take action today — urge Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell to adopt legislation requiring insurance companies to cover genetic counseling and testing for the BRAC1 and BRAC2 mutations. Sign the petition below and tell a friend!

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Dear Secretary Sylvia Burwell,

I urge you to adopt legislation requiring all insurance companies to provide coverage for BRCA gene testing upon recommendation from a medical professional. Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and the second leading cause of cancer death, and unfortunately most of us know at least one mother, sister, or friend who has been touched by this disease.

A woman who has inherited a harmful mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 is about five times more likely to develop breast cancer than a woman who does not have such a mutation, and families have the right to know about their own genetic risks. Medical experts, not insurance companies, should decide who is eligible for genetic testing. Your support is crucial to make these powerful prevention tools accessible to those who are at risk.

Petition Signatures


Dec 4, 2016 Margaret Vernon
Dec 2, 2016 K Zoll
Dec 2, 2016 Angie Baldasso
Nov 29, 2016 JillMarie Fleming
Nov 21, 2016 Patricia Gillespie
Nov 21, 2016 Jason Wood
Nov 21, 2016 Beverly Hindin
Nov 21, 2016 Chris Moore It doesn't take an Einstein to understand that in the long run - PREVENTIVE CARE SAVES MONEY & LIVES! YES, we should ALL have the opportunity to get tested early in life so we know what to expect. Insurance companies do the right thing & cover the costs!
Nov 21, 2016 (Name not displayed)
Nov 21, 2016 Eileen Lankow
Nov 21, 2016 (Name not displayed)
Nov 21, 2016 Diane Shaudys
Nov 21, 2016 Juanita Westberg
Nov 21, 2016 Audrey Dick I had an aunt with breast cancer; mother with ovarian cancer, sister with uterine cancer and wanted to get the genetic testing but Medicare or my secondary insurance won't cover UNTIL I get cancer!!! Uterine cancer is not discovered until it's too, too l
Nov 21, 2016 (Name not displayed)
Nov 21, 2016 Janis Manes
Nov 13, 2016 Kristin Trager
Nov 12, 2016 (Name not displayed)
Nov 8, 2016 (Name not displayed)
Nov 8, 2016 Erin Cromer
Nov 3, 2016 (Name not displayed)
Nov 2, 2016 (Name not displayed)
Nov 2, 2016 Lucy Peden
Nov 1, 2016 Amanda Leddy
Nov 1, 2016 Donna Goldman This testing is too important to only be available at the whim of BIG INSURANCE. They should not be in charge of dictating which testing is appropriate for an individual. This should be within the patient-doctor purview.
Oct 29, 2016 Carol Carter
Oct 27, 2016 Stacey McCoy
Oct 27, 2016 Quentin Fischer
Oct 25, 2016 Marsha Croner
Oct 25, 2016 Andrea Witt
Oct 24, 2016 cindy austin
Oct 20, 2016 Michele Freeman
Oct 20, 2016 Batya Harlow
Oct 18, 2016 Tammy Elliott
Oct 18, 2016 Virginia Dempsey
Oct 17, 2016 aLeXX GoloWin
Oct 17, 2016 cindy stein
Oct 16, 2016 Anthony Hostetter
Oct 14, 2016 Sarah Robinson
Oct 13, 2016 Holly McDonald
Oct 13, 2016 Mariah Oyondi
Oct 13, 2016 Judith Vincent
Oct 11, 2016 Gail Rathmel
Oct 9, 2016 Timothy Smerken
Oct 4, 2016 Lois Nottingham
Oct 3, 2016 (Name not displayed)
Oct 3, 2016 Bethany Ransom
Oct 2, 2016 Hattie Saylor My mother had breast cancer which was caught early, my sister had breast cancer and had to have a mastectomy. There are no other women in my family When I asked to have the BRCA test I was denied.
Oct 1, 2016 (Name not displayed)
Sep 30, 2016 Keith D'Alessandro

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