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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 9,545
Sponsored by: The Breast Cancer Site

Getting a mastectomy is a life- and body-changing event for breast cancer survivors. In today's always-online world, it's natural that survivors who have endured a mastectomy would like to share their “battle scars” with friends and family on social media.

Facebook is very clear that they do, in fact, allow post-mastectomy photos. Their Help Center states, "We agree that undergoing a mastectomy is a life-changing experience and that sharing photos can help raise awareness about breast cancer and support the men and women facing a diagnosis, undergoing treatment or living with the scars of cancer. The vast majority of these kinds of photos are compliant with our policies."

But in practice, many breast cancer survivors have experienced the shame and outrage of having posted a post-mastectomy photo only to have it flagged as inappropriate content.

Why does this happen?

Facebook allows users to flag images for offensive content, and the website's algorithm usually removes the image without considering context. Cancer survivors have to go through the hassle of disputing the automatic removal of their image, despite the fact that Facebook's Terms of Service is very clear that post-mastectomy images are allowed on the site.

Facebook needs to stop its blanket approach to banning images. They need to have real people decide what images should and should not be banned. Breast cancer survivors should not have to fight to post what Facebook has already said is allowed on their website!

Sign Here






Dear Mark Zuckerberg,

It has come to my attention that many breast cancer survivors are feeling persecuted and silenced after they attempt to share post-mastectomy pictures on your website. Facebook's policy on this is clear. The Help Center states, "We agree that undergoing a mastectomy is a life-changing experience and that sharing photos can help raise awareness about breast cancer and support the men and women facing a diagnosis, undergoing treatment or living with the scars of cancer. The vast majority of these kinds of photos are compliant with our policies."

Breast cancer survivors, however, are often not having experiences that align with this stated policy. Too many survivors have shared post-mastectomy photos only to have the images be flagged and removed by Facebook's algorithm. To get their images back online, survivors have to go through a tedious customer support system. This is not something they should have to do. Furthermore, no survivor should have to go through the pain and anguish of having a banned image imply that their body is somehow inadequate or unacceptable. Cancer is hard enough. Post-mastectomy pictures are a way for survivors to bring awareness to the disease, and also bring to light the strength and indomitable spirit needed to endure it.

Mr. Zuckerberg, please spearhead a revision of Facebook's system for banning images. Flagged images should have a human making judgement calls before they are removed from the site. Doing so would save many breast cancer survivors countless hours of stress and shame that Facebook agrees they should not have experienced in the first place.

Thank you for your help,

Petition Signatures


Sep 18, 2017 susan simcock there is nothing wrong with the pictures posted online it is a part of life I too had a mastectomy and I did not know what to expect so keep the images coming I say
Sep 13, 2017 Leticia Zepeda
Sep 13, 2017 Gina Frangella
Sep 13, 2017 Carole Bayer Nothing bad about pictures, it says ,I'm a survivor! I am a survivor of 35 years , with scars!
Sep 10, 2017 J'nell Geer As a Breast Cancer survivor, I realize the fear and uncertainty that grips you as you face the unknown. Having a visual guide to what is to be expected in the end stages, is crucial to overcoming these fears. Stop blocking something so healing.
Sep 6, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Sep 5, 2017 Denise Griffin
Sep 5, 2017 Val Mason
Sep 5, 2017 CAROL HENDERSON
Sep 5, 2017 Caroline Coote
Sep 5, 2017 (Name not displayed) I think it is terrible that FB not only takes the photos down, but blocks the poster from using FB for a week or two. It is so stupid. I'd much rather see breasts than emaciated & abused animals or children.
Sep 5, 2017 Judy Besse
Sep 4, 2017 John Moszyk
Sep 4, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Sep 4, 2017 Sheila Gervase-Cain
Sep 4, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Sep 3, 2017 Linda Rhodes
Sep 3, 2017 Kitty Keith
Sep 3, 2017 Julia Burke
Sep 2, 2017 Jennifer Hall
Aug 30, 2017 Ann Achuff
Aug 28, 2017 Joe lONGO
Aug 28, 2017 Thomas Windberg
Aug 28, 2017 elizabeth cano
Aug 28, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 23, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 21, 2017 Jeffrey Bains
Aug 20, 2017 Carmen N Bosque
Aug 20, 2017 Mary Delger
Aug 18, 2017 sherryann pardee
Aug 17, 2017 Ann Reed
Aug 15, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 14, 2017 Karin Dicker
Aug 13, 2017 Sylvia Ellis
Aug 11, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 10, 2017 Nicki Yokota As a breast cancer survivor who has undergone a masectomy, I fully support this request and petition. Please change your current policy to help with our healing, further knowledge and education, and offer opportunities for connection and support. Thanks.
Aug 10, 2017 Kelly Lewis
Aug 10, 2017 Michelle Shirey
Aug 10, 2017 lucinda meeks
Aug 9, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 9, 2017 (Name not displayed) Survivor 2005 and 2017.
Aug 9, 2017 Rebecca Nalley
Aug 8, 2017 Pamela Russo Survivor (x2)
Aug 8, 2017 Tammy Thaxton I am a survivor
Aug 7, 2017 R Vanstrien
Aug 7, 2017 Thao Vu
Aug 7, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 7, 2017 Brian Reynolds
Aug 7, 2017 Mary Bost
Aug 3, 2017 (Name not displayed)

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