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Today, the vast majority of medical research is done on men, with women compromising only one-third of test subjects.

The cause and rationale behind this is a long and complex one. In 1977, the FDA recommended that women of childbearing age essentially be excluded from clinical trials after medical disasters like the Thalidomide tragedy and synthetic estrogen known as DES, which led to malignancies in reproductive organs. Women's bodies also go through considerably more change then men's in the forms of menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause which can complicate research data sets.

But for those women who are willing to participate in medical research studies, all of the above facts are reasons why men and women must be separated when it comes to medical research.

Symptoms of medical complications, such as heart attacks, are experienced differently in men and women. A general unfamiliarity of women's symptoms when they don't match men's has cost countless lives in the form of misdiagnosis. Women also absorb and react to medicine differently than men which can lead to complications and side-effects unanticipated by male-dominated drug trials.

Clearly, something needs to be done. Women's health needs cannot be ignored any longer. While there is wisdom in the decision to limit women's participation in studies to protect the unborn, those women who do choose to participate in studies should not have their results scrutinized under the same standards as men. Quite simply, male and female bodies are different, and medical data should treat them as such.

Ask the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research to require studies to separate their results by male and female for the entire research process rather than lumping them together and to draw separate recommendations for the safe use of medicine for men and women.

Sign Here






To the Director of the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research,

I am writing to you today to express my concern after discovering that the FDA does not require medical research and drug trials to separate their findings by the sex of their participants. To get better data on the way women respond to specific drugs and treatment, this must change.

As you are no doubt aware, women and men do not always display the same signs, symptoms, or reactions to treatment. Symptoms of medical complications, such as heart attacks, are experienced differently in men and women. A general unfamiliarity of women's symptoms when they don't match men's has cost countless lives in the form of misdiagnosis. Women also absorb and react to medicine differently than men which can lead to complications and side-effects unanticipated by male-dominated drug trials.

I understand that in 1977, the FDA recommended that women of childbearing age essentially be excluded from clinical trials after medical disasters like the Thalidomide tragedy and synthetic estrogen known as DES, which led to malignancies in reproductive organs. I also realize that women's bodies also go through considerably more change then men's in the forms of menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause which can complicate research data sets.

While there is wisdom in the decision to limit women's participation in studies to protect the unborn, those women who do choose to participate in studies should not have their results scrutinized under the same standards as men. Quite simply, male and female bodies are different, and medical data should treat them as such.

Women need to benefit from medical trials by having researchers separate their data by sex. Please, change your policies to require studies to separate their results by male and female for the entire research process rather than lumping them together and to draw separate recommendations for the safe use of medicine for men and women.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


Jun 20, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jun 20, 2018 Margaret Wing
Jun 20, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jun 20, 2018 Tina Keeble
Jun 20, 2018 Abby Bernhardt
Jun 20, 2018 Deirdre Gately
Jun 19, 2018 jacqueline osuna
Jun 19, 2018 Sandra Vohs
Jun 19, 2018 Pamela DelPadre-Mahon
Jun 19, 2018 susan shi
Jun 19, 2018 Cyndi Fritzler
Jun 19, 2018 Elizabeth Hurlbut
Jun 19, 2018 Christine Wintour
Jun 19, 2018 Wendy Farias
Jun 19, 2018 Karen McCann
Jun 19, 2018 Karla Ortiz
Jun 19, 2018 PAULETTE LICHVAR
Jun 19, 2018 SANDRY SAMPER
Jun 19, 2018 Helene Mårtensson
Jun 19, 2018 Judy Wang
Jun 19, 2018 Norman Traum
Jun 19, 2018 ILeana Sune
Jun 19, 2018 Robin Wear
Jun 19, 2018 Annelie Kullander
Jun 19, 2018 John Orlitta
Jun 19, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jun 19, 2018 Alice Savage
Jun 19, 2018 PATRICA METSINGER
Jun 19, 2018 David Nikkel
Jun 19, 2018 Lisa Sherman
Jun 19, 2018 Marga Gili
Jun 19, 2018 ROSENDA LUZ LARA ALVAREZ
Jun 19, 2018 Ian Whitelaw
Jun 19, 2018 Roxana Moya
Jun 19, 2018 Dale E. Boswell
Jun 19, 2018 Judi Kaminski
Jun 19, 2018 Patricia Stern
Jun 19, 2018 Marguerite White sign and share please
Jun 19, 2018 Deanna Bartlett
Jun 19, 2018 Robert Stroud
Jun 19, 2018 Elisabeth Klein
Jun 19, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jun 19, 2018 Andrea Neufield
Jun 19, 2018 Myra Skidmore
Jun 19, 2018 Jan Weiner
Jun 19, 2018 Judith Konig
Jun 19, 2018 Diana Castelo
Jun 19, 2018 Gayle Vistine
Jun 19, 2018 Julia Gray
Jun 19, 2018 Savannah Hawkins

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