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Today, the vast majority of medical research is done on men, with women compromising only one-third of test subjects.

The cause and rationale behind this is a long and complex one. In 1977, the FDA recommended that women of childbearing age essentially be excluded from clinical trials after medical disasters like the Thalidomide tragedy and synthetic estrogen known as DES, which led to malignancies in reproductive organs. Women's bodies also go through considerably more change then men's in the forms of menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause which can complicate research data sets.

But for those women who are willing to participate in medical research studies, all of the above facts are reasons why men and women must be separated when it comes to medical research.

Symptoms of medical complications, such as heart attacks, are experienced differently in men and women. A general unfamiliarity of women's symptoms when they don't match men's has cost countless lives in the form of misdiagnosis. Women also absorb and react to medicine differently than men which can lead to complications and side-effects unanticipated by male-dominated drug trials.

Clearly, something needs to be done. Women's health needs cannot be ignored any longer. While there is wisdom in the decision to limit women's participation in studies to protect the unborn, those women who do choose to participate in studies should not have their results scrutinized under the same standards as men. Quite simply, male and female bodies are different, and medical data should treat them as such.

Ask the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research to require studies to separate their results by male and female for the entire research process rather than lumping them together and to draw separate recommendations for the safe use of medicine for men and women.

Sign Here






To the Director of the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research,

I am writing to you today to express my concern after discovering that the FDA does not require medical research and drug trials to separate their findings by the sex of their participants. To get better data on the way women respond to specific drugs and treatment, this must change.

As you are no doubt aware, women and men do not always display the same signs, symptoms, or reactions to treatment. Symptoms of medical complications, such as heart attacks, are experienced differently in men and women. A general unfamiliarity of women's symptoms when they don't match men's has cost countless lives in the form of misdiagnosis. Women also absorb and react to medicine differently than men which can lead to complications and side-effects unanticipated by male-dominated drug trials.

I understand that in 1977, the FDA recommended that women of childbearing age essentially be excluded from clinical trials after medical disasters like the Thalidomide tragedy and synthetic estrogen known as DES, which led to malignancies in reproductive organs. I also realize that women's bodies also go through considerably more change then men's in the forms of menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause which can complicate research data sets.

While there is wisdom in the decision to limit women's participation in studies to protect the unborn, those women who do choose to participate in studies should not have their results scrutinized under the same standards as men. Quite simply, male and female bodies are different, and medical data should treat them as such.

Women need to benefit from medical trials by having researchers separate their data by sex. Please, change your policies to require studies to separate their results by male and female for the entire research process rather than lumping them together and to draw separate recommendations for the safe use of medicine for men and women.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


Sep 20, 2017 Bożena Staniszewska
Sep 4, 2017 Sheila Ward
Aug 29, 2017 Richard Bosboom
Aug 28, 2017 Thomas Windberg
Aug 23, 2017 Gil Hackel
Aug 20, 2017 Teresa Kohl
Aug 17, 2017 Melissa Lohman
Aug 13, 2017 Linda Haines
Aug 8, 2017 Susan Lindsey
Aug 7, 2017 Rilla Heslin
Aug 7, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 7, 2017 Robin Shepard
Aug 3, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 3, 2017 Rosie Albanese
Aug 2, 2017 Yvonne Barker
Aug 2, 2017 choky alvarez
Aug 2, 2017 Juliet Castille
Aug 2, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jul 31, 2017 Brianna Onken
Jul 31, 2017 Alicia Bynum
Jul 31, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jul 31, 2017 George Anderson
Jul 26, 2017 patty currey
Jul 25, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jul 24, 2017 Rafael Sacho
Jul 21, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jul 21, 2017 Sławomir Prucnal
Jul 20, 2017 Selma castanheira dos santos
Jul 20, 2017 Larissa -
Jul 20, 2017 Catheryn Sproull
Jul 20, 2017 Karen McHugh
Jul 20, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jul 20, 2017 Kathleen Richard
Jul 19, 2017 Joan Christensen Women truly have different problems and responses to treatment.
Jul 19, 2017 Jeanine Smegal
Jul 19, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jul 19, 2017 Alanna Reuben
Jul 19, 2017 Fern Swecker
Jul 19, 2017 Joshua Santos
Jul 19, 2017 sarah stevens
Jul 19, 2017 Juliet Francis
Jul 19, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jul 19, 2017 Magdalini M.
Jul 19, 2017 tj bolduc
Jul 19, 2017 Daniel Abbott
Jul 19, 2017 Maria Fantacci
Jul 19, 2017 Jennifer Hawk
Jul 19, 2017 Sheri DeOrio
Jul 19, 2017 Amanda Treffert
Jul 19, 2017 Bonnie Walsh

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