Skip navigation

no spam, unsubscribe anytime.
Skip navigation
Goal: 30,000 Progress: 5,670
Sponsored by: The Breast Cancer Site

Today, the vast majority of medical research is done on men, with women compromising only one-third of test subjects.

The cause and rationale behind this is a long and complex one. In 1977, the FDA recommended that women of childbearing age essentially be excluded from clinical trials after medical disasters like the Thalidomide tragedy and synthetic estrogen known as DES, which led to malignancies in reproductive organs. Women's bodies also go through considerably more change then men's in the forms of menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause which can complicate research data sets.

But for those women who are willing to participate in medical research studies, all of the above facts are reasons why men and women must be separated when it comes to medical research.

Symptoms of medical complications, such as heart attacks, are experienced differently in men and women. A general unfamiliarity of women's symptoms when they don't match men's has cost countless lives in the form of misdiagnosis. Women also absorb and react to medicine differently than men which can lead to complications and side-effects unanticipated by male-dominated drug trials.

Clearly, something needs to be done. Women's health needs cannot be ignored any longer. While there is wisdom in the decision to limit women's participation in studies to protect the unborn, those women who do choose to participate in studies should not have their results scrutinized under the same standards as men. Quite simply, male and female bodies are different, and medical data should treat them as such.

Ask the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research to require studies to separate their results by male and female for the entire research process rather than lumping them together and to draw separate recommendations for the safe use of medicine for men and women.

Sign Here






To the Director of the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research,

I am writing to you today to express my concern after discovering that the FDA does not require medical research and drug trials to separate their findings by the sex of their participants. To get better data on the way women respond to specific drugs and treatment, this must change.

As you are no doubt aware, women and men do not always display the same signs, symptoms, or reactions to treatment. Symptoms of medical complications, such as heart attacks, are experienced differently in men and women. A general unfamiliarity of women's symptoms when they don't match men's has cost countless lives in the form of misdiagnosis. Women also absorb and react to medicine differently than men which can lead to complications and side-effects unanticipated by male-dominated drug trials.

I understand that in 1977, the FDA recommended that women of childbearing age essentially be excluded from clinical trials after medical disasters like the Thalidomide tragedy and synthetic estrogen known as DES, which led to malignancies in reproductive organs. I also realize that women's bodies also go through considerably more change then men's in the forms of menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause which can complicate research data sets.

While there is wisdom in the decision to limit women's participation in studies to protect the unborn, those women who do choose to participate in studies should not have their results scrutinized under the same standards as men. Quite simply, male and female bodies are different, and medical data should treat them as such.

Women need to benefit from medical trials by having researchers separate their data by sex. Please, change your policies to require studies to separate their results by male and female for the entire research process rather than lumping them together and to draw separate recommendations for the safe use of medicine for men and women.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


Nov 18, 2017 Jim Sheridan
Nov 17, 2017 Paul Statman
Nov 13, 2017 susan munro
Nov 7, 2017 Jodi Abel
Nov 7, 2017 Signe Dayhoff
Nov 7, 2017 Terri Lynch
Nov 7, 2017 Kimberly Boden
Nov 7, 2017 Jacqueline Roberts
Oct 31, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Oct 31, 2017 valerie choinski
Oct 29, 2017 helen Gärtner
Oct 27, 2017 Julie Berberi
Oct 27, 2017 Wendy Horn
Oct 27, 2017 Carmen Rodriguez
Oct 27, 2017 jovita diaz
Oct 26, 2017 Choky Alvarez
Oct 26, 2017 Heather Hall
Oct 26, 2017 Kara Gallant
Oct 26, 2017 Kimberly Visconti
Oct 26, 2017 Jamie Green
Oct 26, 2017 Linda Kehew
Oct 26, 2017 (Name not displayed) As a breast cancer survivor. I find the fact that the pink ribbon is used for companies to make extra profits because consumers choose the pink ribbon items over competitors thinking they are doing a good thing in aiding breast cancer research.
Oct 26, 2017 Betsy Owen
Oct 26, 2017 Teresa Kohl
Oct 26, 2017 Alison Ridgeway
Oct 26, 2017 Carol Henderson Come on guys, get with the program. Women need to be included in all medical research and drug trials. Men aren't the only sex on the planet.
Oct 26, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Oct 26, 2017 Teri Thompson
Oct 26, 2017 Marie D'Anna
Oct 26, 2017 Jenelle Back -Sercombe
Oct 26, 2017 Keira Manes As a woman, using medications that have not been tested on women is very troubling, as there are many studies that indicate that women and men respond differently to diseases and medications.
Oct 26, 2017 Deborah Stiles
Oct 26, 2017 Caroline Godin
Oct 26, 2017 Kari Lindewirth
Oct 26, 2017 Catherine McCormack
Oct 26, 2017 John Meinke
Oct 26, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Oct 26, 2017 Kay Shelton
Oct 25, 2017 Kimberly Wallace
Oct 23, 2017 Sadaf Bhutta
Oct 23, 2017 Christiane Santos
Oct 22, 2017 Bonnie Clyne
Oct 22, 2017 David Pawlowski
Oct 22, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Oct 21, 2017 Lisa Frye
Oct 20, 2017 anita hayes
Oct 19, 2017 Samantha Honowitz
Oct 19, 2017 Ana Jimenez-Bolanos
Oct 19, 2017 Erif Thunen
Oct 19, 2017 Catherine Clyne

back to top

Share this page and help fund mammograms: