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Love Can Keep You Going

My Mom was diagnosed with breast cancer when I was 15 years old. Today, I am 36 years old and my Mom still has breast cancer. It has metastasized to her liver, lungs and bones. I have watched her go through some of the hardest battles a woman can endure. I used to live in constant fear that I was going to get a phone call and my best friend and Mom would be taken from me. Now that I am older and have had 21 years to accept what my Mom has to battle on a daily basis, I am thankful when that phone rings. I hear her voice and I know she has woken up to fight another day. I am not in denial. I know that one day she will be taken up to a better place where she will feel no pain and be free from all of the side effects of her illness. What I am is hopeful, blessed and thankful. I have had the privilege to make memories and bless this formidable woman with Grandchildren and those Grandchildren have been able to make memories with her, as well. I am hopeful that she will be here for my 40th Birthday and I am so thankful for all of the above. She is my rock and my inspiration. She has taught me to fight hard for anything I truly want in life. Nothing is out of reach if you just believe!

Jonquil Norman
Muskegon, MI

Cancer messed with the wrong Bit*h

Was diagnosed February 2014 with stage 3 inflammatory breast cancer.The adventure started with my left breast swelling to the size of a small basketball.Went to my doctors in November 2013, was sent for mammogram results negative (nothing to worry about as per technician). Back to doctors,send a referral to the Breast Clinic. Three months before I could get in, didn't want to wait that long. Decided to visit emergency department, nurse practitioner was the first to take a blood sample results no infection, suspected something more serious. Contacted the breast clinic to get the appointment moved up to a sooner date, rescheduled within one week. Still not satisfied another emergency department. Emergency doctor ordered ultra sound came back negative, couldn't see anything. Remember him putting his hand on my knee and telling me his thoughts, they weren't great. He stated he thought it was Cancer but couldn't diagnose without more testing. Scheduled an ultra sound at local hospital on the following Monday. Technician couldn't see anything, wanted to go a step further and decided to schedule a biopsy. Waited 2 hours before biopsy could be performed. My wonderful husband was there by my side holding my hand throughout whole experience. Seen breast doctor on Friday, got news Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage 3. A day I will never forget. Started chemo April 2014, 8 rounds of chemo, last day (August 27, 2014) . A double mastectomy with reconstruction surgery, 25 rounds of radiation began on November 12, 2014 and ended December 17, 2014. Cancer free! I won't have been able to complete this journey without the incredible support system, my wonderful husband, my sons, my wonderful sisters and family close and far. My work family that were understanding and supportive allowing my husband time needed to take care of me.

Angela Plesniarski
Winnipeg, MB, Canada

Happy Shiny-Headed Me!

I was diagnosed at age 33 with stage 3 invasive ductal carcinoma aka Breast Cancer. The strange part was that I was in no way, shape, or form surprised. The summer before my diagnosis I was becoming tired often and experienced frequent arm pain. Eventually, I felt the lump under my arm and before the Oncologist could say it was confirmed; I had already confirmed it in my own mind. Just the thought of what was to come made me frightened and ill. I faced it head on-pardon the pun (bald is beautiful) and held on to my character, strength and humor throughout it all. Chemo was aggressive and lasted for a 6month time frame. My hair, a head full of soft curls began to change in texture. I cut it into a bob and still it continued to change. Then one day the few inches of coarse hay fell out in clumps-exposing my scalp. I called for a barber I knew to come to my home and to bring the straight razor. It was a shock to see the shiny orb that sat above my shoulders. I was both impressed at the perfect sphere shape and tortured by the absence of my curly locks. It is possible to be happy and devastated simultaneously, to laugh and shed tears of pain in one moment.

Remember I mentioned I had to hold on to my humor? Trust me I held on tightly; especially when going to the Cancer Center to try on wigs.

Every oddly colored, matted and mangled concoction of artificial and real-hair wigs was presented to me in 45 minute's time. Whoa! If there was ever a time that I considered being completely bald on a regular basis; it was then. So I took a trip to several hair supply stores in some sketchy areas and low and behold-it was like I hit the hair lottery! I found colors that complimented and cuts that flattered. I was beyond excited and couldn't wait to get those bad boys on.

Oh, Iv'e run out of space-and there is so much more.......

Cassandra
Bristol, CT

Cancer Suvivor 4X

I am a 3X Cancer Survivor since I was 14 . I had HD, Schwanoma . (cancer of the lining of the nerve) and Thyroid. I was diagnosed with BC Dec 11 2014. It was caused from the radiation treatment I had 33 years ago. I am now 47 . I'm not sure what form of cancer, because I was suppose to go today to get the results of finding out how much chemo I am receiving. I will also be going through a double mastectomy with reconstructive surgery after my chemo treatments. What I take from my past experiences, is that I am stronger than strong, and "Laughter is the best Medicine"! Life throws us a curveball, that is meant to hit us, not dodge It will mould me and shape me into the person I am suppose to be.

"Sometimes you have to get knocked down lower than you've ever been, to stand up taller than you ever were."

Crystal Conway
Elmsdale, NS, Canada

Why I Still Want My Foobies

Hi everyone!

My name is Julie Goiset. I'm a 2 time breast cancer survivor, single mom, massage therapist and just turned 40!

I need to go through breast reconstruction again. I will be doing tissue expanders and implants again. It's done in 2 surgeries, spaced out by 4 months or so. Recovery time after each surgery would be 3-4 weeks given no complications. I used up all my resources going through chemo and bilatteral mastectomy in 2011, and here we are in 2015 and still haven't had the reconstruction, mostly due to financial reasons. Taking time off work for me involves having a savings. I still need to pay for rent, bills and feed my kids. So here I am, asking my community for help. I am willing to wait as long as it takes because I realize this is what I really want.

In 2011, when I was diagnosed for the 2nd time and had to face chemo and surgery again, I could not bear the thought of ever doing this again! That's why I opted for a bilatteral mastectomy. Well things always don't go as planned and I got an infection a week after I got my foobies and was in the hospital for a week and had to have them removed due to a mycobacterial infection. I was qutie devastated:( But knew when I was ready, I could try again. It has now been 3 years since I lost my breasts and turning 40 has given me the gusto to get what I want! So here I am, hoping and praying that I will get some foobies(fake boobs).

I am very grateful for any support you are willing to give to me and my family during this final process. It means so much to me! Many blessings to you!

With peace and gratitude,

Julie Goiset

Julie Goiset
Carson, CA

Life After Cancer

It was the summer of 2003, and school had just let out. I am teacher, and usually take care of all my yearly appointments in the summer. I was 59 at the time, in good health, no history of any breast cancer in my family. I exercised, ate healthy, and really tried to take care of myself. I went for my yearly mammogram, having done this uneventfully for the past 10 years. This time was different. I could see it on the radiologist's face! And, so it went....more mammograms, needle biopsy, diagnosis...invasive lobular cancer, stage 1. I think I was in shock because I felt if it could happen to me, then, it could happen to anyone!!! I cried at first, like we all do, then went into fighting mode. Bilateral mastectomy with immediate reconstruction, 4 rounds of chemo with hair falling out. No radiation, thank goodness since it was not close to the chest wall. I did not work during that time, and my husband also happened to lose his job at the same time. It was really a blessing to have him home with me most of the time. God was good!! Our church basically fed us for those months, and in March, 2004, I got a call to come back to work to take the place of a teacher who had left. By that time, my hair was growing back, I felt I needed to get my life back to normal, whatever that meant! Within 24 hours of my getting that call, my husband got a call to go back to work! It has now been 11 1/2 years, and I remain cancer free. Cancer treatment is hard, I will not lie, but there is life beyond cancer. I am now 71 years old, still teaching 3rd graders at a great school! Oh, and I forgot to say, my son was just finishing 5th grad when all this happened and now he is married and a special ed teacher of severely autistic elementary students!! Life is GREAT!!!

Kaye Neufeld
Johnstown, CO

My Hero: Doris Parreno

Doris Parreno went to the doctor for a routine physical. On November, 2011, she had a mammogram and was diagnosed with Breast Cancer, Triple Positive, Estrogen Positive, High Grade, DCIS, Invasive, Aggressive Carcinoma. She was prescribed a very heavy treatment which included Lumpectomy, Chemotherapy, Radiation, Herceptin and Tamoxifen for 5 years. She did get the lumpectomy. The rest of the treatment was so scary considering it was referred to it as “preventive treatment”. Before her scheduled chemo date, she did a lot of research as to various options but was hesitant to try anything else because she figured the hospitals know best. In the process of her research, she heard Suzanne Somers talk about ‘chemo sensitivity test’. Doris thought it made sense if she had to do chemo she better do that test. She did the test and discovered that the chemo that was going to be given had a very high chance of not working. She had seen friends go through ‘chemo’ that did not work; and it could have been recipe for disaster. So, she asked her oncologist if she could have the chemo that was going to work based on the chemo sensitivity test. She told Doris that they do not customize treatment for patients and what was offered is what she would have to take. The test also offered alternative therapies that were non toxic and seemed to work for the circulating tumour cells that Doris had. She had no choice but to go the alternative route. As soon as she started to follow that route she started to get better. In one month her area of inflammation went down 75% and her numbers improved; so it was working and she didn’t have to compromise her immune system. She went on an intense program to fight the battle with cancer on intense IV therapy, supplements, needles, German acupuncture, Gerson Therapy and essential oils. Three years after her diagnosis, she can say that she is on her way to full healing. Doris now dedicates her time by telling others of this alternative route.

Norma Trivino
Richmond Hill, ON, Canada

Victory over Liver Cancer

Hello everyone, My name is Hilary Ivan, i want to use this medium to share my miracle story, my father was diagnose of liver cancer cinomia he has been in critical condition for over 11months. A friend of mine directed us to Rick Simpson via his email address and we established contact, Rick Hemp and Cannabis Oil was successfully used in curing my father Liver cancer as stated in the dosage information provided by Rick Simpson. Once again I want to thank Rick for his wonderful Hemp Oil as my family is now a strong happy one.

For those of you that are having cancer challenges you can contact Rick Simpson via his direct email (ricksimpson096@gmail.com)

God Bless you all...

Hilary Ivan
Junction City, KS

Ya gotta laugh

after years of mammograms in lumpy breasts, in 2001 i felt a lump in my armpit. i had hub feel it, but i did nothing about it, because it was in my armpit. A year later, i felt a tiny lump in my breast, and went to the dr. I had a mammogram, then was called back for an ultrasound. Met with the surgeon, had a surgical biopsy. The biopsy turned out to be cancer. i was 44 and had breast cancer! The big lump in my armpit? cancer. i also had a 5cm lump that I never even felt. May 8th, i had a sentinal node biopsy (which failed when the dye wouldn't travel). So i ended up with 14 lymph nodes taken out (4 were positive for cancer).The dr removed 3 lumps. i found out that i had stage 3 cancer, ER positive.

i was scheduled for a/c chemo and 33 radiations. Lost my hair (which i lost my mind over. i have terrible hair so i don't know why i was upset). The first day of chemo i cried like a baby. BUT after that, i chose to fight cancer with a sense of humor. i worked through my entire treatments. never missed a day. my work friends laughed with me, at me (my request). Everything was funny and it made having cancer so much easier. I never got sick. i wore baseball hats and ugly scarves. it's been 13 years and even though i have had a couple of scares, i'm still cancer free!

Debbie
pine valley, CA

My story surviving Breast Cancer

I had a mammogram in March of 2009 and it was normal. In May 2009 I found a pea size lump in my right breast. Watched it for a couple months, it didn't go away or get any bigger. I asked my boyfriend at the time to feel it, he's like maybe you should get it checked. So in August of 2009 I went to my family doctor and she referred me to a surgeon. The surgeon did a biopsy but it came back inconclusive. She scheduled surgery to remove it. The results came back I had Stage (1) invasive Breast Cancer. Fortunately I did not need chemo, but I had 6 weeks of radiation. Then I was placed on Arimidex for 5 years. I'm happy to say as of today I'm a 5 year survivor. I'm so grateful to my boyfriend to have encourage me to have it checked. My surgeon said had I waited for my next mammogram my prognosis wouldn't have been that good. So I encourage everyone if something doesn't feel right have it checked immediately I'm so glad I did.

Karen
North Olmsted, OH
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